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Supply Lists

Lower School

Middle School

Upper School

All Upper School classroom supplies are personalized in the Upper School level by individual faculty members and their courses. Communication with students for class supplies will be made on the first day of class. Generally, notebooks, writing utensils, calculators and other materials are all tailored to the need of a particular class and those needs will be communicated on the first day of school.
 

Calculator Requirements

Calculator needs of students in The Village School of Naples Upper School
Students in Algebra 1 do NOT need a calculator at all. When we do calculations that require a calculator, one will be supplied to the student. However, if parents want to plan ahead, they can look at recommendations for Geometry and Algebra 2.
 
Students in Geometry have three options:
  1. A Geometry student does NOT need to purchase a calculator, because one will be supplied when they need it.
  2. A Geometry student may purchase a scientific calculator. These range in price from $9 to $20. They should have buttons for the functions: sin, cos, and tan. This calculator will not be sufficient for subsequent math courses. Some models to consider are: TI-30 (various models), Casio fx-300MS, Casio FX-991ESPLUS
  3. A Geometry student may purchase a graphing calculator. It will work for all high school math classes. See the calculators recommended below for Algebra 2.
 
Students in Algebra 2 should purchase a graphing calculator. During most of the year, these calculators cost about $120, but in August, Office Depot/Max, Staples, Target, and WalMart usually have sales with the calculators costing about $90. Recommendations follow:
  1. The most commonly used graphing calculator is the TI-84 plus. There are several different versions which basically have the same capabilities. The TI-84 plus CE has beautiful graphics. (The TI-83 plus does nearly as much as the TI-84 plus. The TI-Nspire CX is a good option, but works a little differently from the others.)
  2. Alternatives are: Casio FX-9860G11, Casio fx-CG10 PRIZM, Casio fx-CG50, and HP Prime Graphing Calculator. The drawback of these is that I am not familiar with them, so the student would be on their own to learn how to use it.
  3. I do NOT recommend the TI-89, nor the TI-Nspire CAS, which are allowed on AP and SAT exams, but NOT on the ACT exam, because they are more difficult to use and have some capabilities that the student should develop for themselves.
Students in Precalculus should already have a graphing calculator. If not, see the recommendations for Algebra 2.
 
Students in AP Statistics should already have a graphing calculator. If not, see the recommendations for Algebra 2.

Summer Learning

Middle School

Required

Math IXL

During the summer, each student is to complete one hour of grade appropriate practice each week on IXL.com. This may be on topics on the last completed grade (or mathematics course) for review, or on the grade (or mathematics course) for next year for a challenge. The student should find moderate success in the topics chosen. If a student makes a low “smart score” on a topic, they should not continue with the topic. Instead, they should make note of the topic and ask the teacher about it in the fall. If a student easily progresses through a topic, they may go on to the next topic.
 

5th Grade

Rising 5th Grade Math Skills

6th Grade

Rising 6th Grade Math Skills

7th Grade

Rising 7th Grade Math Skills

8th Grade

Rising 8th Grade Math Skills

Reading List

Welcome to summer vacation and the delightful dilemma of deciding how we shall spend our days during the weeks and months away from school. Whatever the holiday holds for your family, we hope that you are able to build in some reading time for your student.
 
There’s a very practical reason we ask all Village School students to read during the summer: to minimize the dreaded “summer slide” that necessitates so much academic review and re-learning in the fall. Imagine how much more our children could learn in school if we could actually pick up in the fall where we left off each spring! Summer reading helps us get closer to that goal. Even more importantly, though, we’d like our students to understand that for many successful, curious, and ambitious adults, reading isn’t what we have to do, but what we get to do. We want our students to grow robust independent reading lives, filled with exactly the types of reading that suit them best as individuals. Summer gives everyone an opportunity to try a new author or genre purely for pleasure, to read without assignments, and to dive wholeheartedly into the fictional world of a book.
 
Beyond the grade-level expectations of Middle School summer reading (see below), we ask simply that students not reread books they’ve already read and not substitute movies for books. Students should be ready, upon the return to school, to write and/or talk about theme and character development in their books, as well as to offer an informal personal review.
 
Here are the specific expectations by grade level:
 

Students entering 5th and 6th Grades

  • If you are enrolled in an Honors section, please read at least two books from the attached list.
  • If you are enrolled in a College Prep section, please read at least one book from the list.


Suggested Titles  for 5th and 6th Grades:

  • The Night Gardener, by Jonathan Auxier
  • Tiger, Tiger, by Lynn Reid Banks
  • The Thing About Jellyfish, by Ali Benjamin
  • The Book Scavenger, by Jennifer Bertram
  • The War That Saved My Life, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  • The Wild Robot, by Peter Brown
  • The School for Good and Evil, by Soman Chainani
  • Summerlost, by Ally Condie
  • Somewhere Among, by Annie Donwerth-Chikamatsu
  • Out of My Mind, by Sharon Draper
  • One Crazy Summer, by Rita Williams Garcia
  • Night Diary, by Veera Hiranandani
  • The Keeper (Young Readers’ Edition), by Tim Howard
  • Fish in a Tree, by Lynda Mullaly Hunt
  • Redwall, by Brian Jacques
  • The Boy Who Harnassed the Wind (Young Readers’ Edition), by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer
  • Amina’s Voice, by Hens Khan
  • A View from Saturday, by E.L. Konigsberg
  • A Mango-Shaped Space, by Wendy Maas
  • The Sixty-Eight Rooms, by Marianne Malone
  • The Tell-Tale Start, by Gordon McAlpine
  • The Candy Shop, by Brandon Mull
  • Wonder, by R.J. Palacio
  • Freak the Mighty, by Rodman Philbrick
  • Story Thieves, by James Riley
  • Fenway Fever, by John Ritter
  • Echo, by Pam Munoz Ryan
  • Amal Unbound, by Aisha Saeed
  • Counting by 7s, by Holly Goldberg Sloan
  • Short, by Holly Goldberg Sloan
  • Crash, by Jerry Spinelli
  • Liar, Spy, by Rebecca Stead
  • The Menagerie, by Tui Sutherland and Kari Sutherland
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred Taylor
  • Loot, by Jude Watson
  • Eddie Red Undercover:  Mystery on Museum Mile, by Marcia Wells
  • Wolf Hollow, by Lauren Wolk
  • A Dragon’s Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans, by Laurence Yep

Students entering 7th Grade

  • If you are enrolled in an Honors section, please read a YA (young adult) novel by Carl Hiaasen (Skink, Hoot, Scat, Flush, Squirm or Chomp) that you have NOT already read, and at least one book from the attached list.
  • If you are enrolled in a College Prep section, please read at least one book from the list.


Suggested Titles  for 7th and 8th Grades:

  • Watership Down, by Richard Adams
  • The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander
  • The Tightrope Walkers, by David Almond
  • The Impossible Knife of Memory, by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, by M.T. Anderson
  • The Islands at the End of the World, by Austin Aslan
  • The Red Queen, by Victoria Aveyard
  • Cold Calls, by Charles Benoit
  • The Raft, by S.A. Bodeen
  • Undertow, by Michael Buckley
  • Code Talker, by Joseph Bruchac
  • Forgive My Fins, by Tera Lynn Childs
  • The Living, by Matt De La Pena
  • BZRK, by Michael Grant
  • Refugee, by Alan Gratz
  • Dangerous, by Shannon Hale
  • Magonia, by Maria Dahvana Headley
  • Safekeeping, by Karen Hesse
  • The Eleventh Plague, by Jeff Hirsch
  • Listen, Slowly, by Thanhha Lai
  • Sweet, by Emmy Laybourne
  • Every Day, by David Levithan
  • We were Liars, by E. Lockhart
  • The Young Elites, by Marie Lu
  • Egg and Spoon, by Gregory Maguire
  • Breakaway:  Beyond the Goal, by Alex Morgan
  • Monster, by Walter Dean Myers
  • Unstoppable:  Harnassing Science to Change the World, by Bill Nye
  • The Boundless, by Kenneth Oppel
  • Middle School:  The Worst Years of My Life, by James Patterson
  • Guts, by Gary Paulsen
  • Words in the Dust, by Trent Reedy
  • Jackaby, by William Ritter
  • Bone Gap, by Laura Ruby
  • Threatened, by Eliot Schrefer
  • Lincoln’s Grave Robbers, by Steve Sheinkin
  • The Port Chicago 50, by Steve Sheinkin
  • Bruiser, by Neal Shusterman
  • Downsiders, by Neal Shusterman
  • I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith
  • The Riverman, by Aaron Starmer
  • Outcasts United, by Warren St. John
  • The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Popular, by Maya Van Wagenen
  • A Time to Dance, by Padma Venkatraman
  • The Age of Miracles, by Karen Thompson Walker
  • Leviathan, by Scott Westerfeld
  • Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson
  • Everything, Everything, by Nicola Yoon
  • The Sun is Also a Star, by Nicola Yoon
  • Marina, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Students entering 8th Grade

  • If you are enrolled in an Honors section, please read I Will Always Write Back, by Caitlin Alifirenka and Martin Ganda, and at least one book from the attached list.
  • If you are enrolled in a College Prep section, please read at least one book from the list.


Suggested Titles  for 7th and 8th Grades:

  • Watership Down, by Richard Adams
  • The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander
  • The Tightrope Walkers, by David Almond
  • The Impossible Knife of Memory, by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, by M.T. Anderson
  • The Islands at the End of the World, by Austin Aslan
  • The Red Queen, by Victoria Aveyard
  • Cold Calls, by Charles Benoit
  • The Raft, by S.A. Bodeen
  • Undertow, by Michael Buckley
  • Code Talker, by Joseph Bruchac
  • Forgive My Fins, by Tera Lynn Childs
  • The Living, by Matt De La Pena
  • BZRK, by Michael Grant
  • Refugee, by Alan Gratz
  • Dangerous, by Shannon Hale
  • Magonia, by Maria Dahvana Headley
  • Safekeeping, by Karen Hesse
  • The Eleventh Plague, by Jeff Hirsch
  • Listen, Slowly, by Thanhha Lai
  • Sweet, by Emmy Laybourne
  • Every Day, by David Levithan
  • We were Liars, by E. Lockhart
  • The Young Elites, by Marie Lu
  • Egg and Spoon, by Gregory Maguire
  • Breakaway:  Beyond the Goal, by Alex Morgan
  • Monster, by Walter Dean Myers
  • Unstoppable:  Harnassing Science to Change the World, by Bill Nye
  • The Boundless, by Kenneth Oppel
  • Middle School:  The Worst Years of My Life, by James Patterson
  • Guts, by Gary Paulsen
  • Words in the Dust, by Trent Reedy
  • Jackaby, by William Ritter
  • Bone Gap, by Laura Ruby
  • Threatened, by Eliot Schrefer
  • Lincoln’s Grave Robbers, by Steve Sheinkin
  • The Port Chicago 50, by Steve Sheinkin
  • Bruiser, by Neal Shusterman
  • Downsiders, by Neal Shusterman
  • I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith
  • The Riverman, by Aaron Starmer
  • Outcasts United, by Warren St. John
  • The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Popular, by Maya Van Wagenen
  • A Time to Dance, by Padma Venkatraman
  • The Age of Miracles, by Karen Thompson Walker
  • Leviathan, by Scott Westerfeld
  • Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson
  • Everything, Everything, by Nicola Yoon
  • The Sun is Also a Star, by Nicola Yoon
  • Marina, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Please note: ANY Newberry Award Winner or Honor Book, ANY Sunshine State Young Readers Award Book, or ANY book from student’s Literacy Week book-tasting list may substitute for ANY title on the lists.
 
We wish you a wonderful and book-filled summer!
 
The Village School English Department

Upper School

Required

AP History

* Required reading for AP History*
 
9th Grade - AP Human Geography
- Standage, Tom. A History of the World in Six Glasses. Walker Publishing Company, 2006
 
10th Grade - AP World History
- Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1999.
 
11th Grade - AP European History
- William Manchester. A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance: Portrait of an Age. Little, Brown and Company, 1993.
 
11th Grade - AP US History
Alexis De Tocqueville - Democracy in America (Part ONE) Link to the online reading: Democracy in America.
 
 

AP English

TVS AP Eng Lang Summer Reading: Just Mercy, by Bryan Stevenson
($9.42 on Amazon right now; ISBN-13: 978-0812984965)
 
Overall goal: awareness of Stevenson’s claim (argumentative message, thesis--WHAT HE SAYS) and the writing moves he makes as he argues it (HOW HE SAYS IT). For the purposes of this course, that includes Stevenson’s own credibility as an authority on the subject, the quality of his evidence, and his awareness of his audience. Your task: read, think, respond, and annotate appropriately.
 
What the heck does that mean? It means I want you to enjoy this book, so I don’t want to ruin that experience by requiring heavy annotation. But I also want you to be able to USE this book, and quickly, when we return in August. So you have to know your way around, be able to find things, remember what you noticed while reading. You decide how you want to do this. Find a balance between too much and not enough. I’ll collect your books and annotations upon our return from vacation, and you will receive a grade for the work you’ve done. Below, you will find some suggestions; you may choose any/all/none/go with some other plan. Just have a plan.
 
Here’s the fun part! After August 1st, check in here
 
Annotating Stylistic and Interpretive Observations: Noticing the Moves a Writer Makes
  • Inside front cover: list major characters, key scenes (w/ page numbers)
  • Bottom and top page margins: make note of key plot moments/summary of action
  • Side margins: stylistic and interpretive observations
  • Circle words you don’t know; number a series of points or examples.
  • Put a question mark in the margin to indicate confusion; exclamation point for surprise.
  • F for figurative language / D for description / I for imagery
  • Star or asterisk * to indicate most important information
  • Marks (checks, arrows, happy/sad/angry surprised faces) to indicate notable but not vital information.
  • Note table of contents: great titles! Jot quick notes on what happens in each chapter.
  • Keep track of anything you feel makes Stevenson a credible source of information: credentials, valuable experience, insight, etc.
  • Take notes in an accompanying notebook, or on stickies (the MS way!!).
Underline or highlight valuable and important lines, of course, but do not do ONLY this--better to explain why you’ve chosen to underline with some other indicator in the margin. Words. In the margin. Of your book. :)

 

Optional

Reading List

*Required if not taking an AP course

Summer Reading list

Math IXL

During the summer, each student is strongly encouraged to complete one hour of grade appropriate practice each week on IXL.com. This may be on topics on the last completed grade (or mathematics course) for review, or on the grade (or mathematics course) for next year for a challenge. The student should find moderate success in the topics chosen. If a student makes a low “smart score” on a topic, they should not continue with the topic. Instead, they should make note of the topic and ask the teacher about it in the fall. If a student easily progresses through a topic, they may go on to the next topic.
 

Algebra 1 from 7th or 8th Grade

For students going from 7th grade math, 8th grade math, or Algebra Readiness to Algebra 1. Work on the following IXL topics.

8th grade IXL.com topics

Algebra 2 from Algebra 1

For students going from Algebra 1 to Algebra 2. Work on the following IXL topics.
 
Algebra 1 topics
 

Algebra 2 from Geometry

For students going from Geometry to Algebra 2. Work on the following IXL topics.
 
Geometry topics
 

Geometry from Algebra 1

For students going from Algebra 1 to Geometry. Work on the following IXL topics.
 
Algebra 1 topics
 

Geometry from Algebra 2

For students going from Algebra 2 to Geometry. Work on the following IXL topics.
 
Algebra 2 topics
 

Precalculus from Geometry

Students going from Geometry to Precalculus, should work on the following IXL topics. The topics marked difficult, may be skipped.
 
Geometry topics
 

AP Statistics

Students going into AP Statistics, should work on the following IXL topics. The topics marked difficult, may be skipped. If you are taking two mathematics classes, you should alternate topics between the two classes. You need to practice one hour per week; you do NOT need to practice two hours per week.
I have chosen some easy probability and statistics topic that you may not have seen before, so you may need to look up some definitions to understand what terms mean.
 
Algebra 1 topics